News search results ( 1 - 2 from 2 )

9 October 2017

EU funding for Metsä Fibre’s long-term development projects

Long-term development projects aim to prove the commercial viability of new technologies to produce lignin-based products and pulp-based textile fibres, bark as a replacement for coal

Metsä Fibre plays an important role in three new development partnerships that have been successful in project evaluations and thus secured multiannual funding from the EU. The concepts of relevance to Metsä Fibre in these partnerships include new technologies to produce lignin-based products and pulp-based textile fibres, as well as the utilisation of bark as a replacement for coal in the production of heat and electricity. The recently initiated long-term development projects aim to prove the commercial viability of these concepts.

“Operating within the EU’s research and development networks demand perseverance and world-class competencies. The EU funding now granted to us is a clear indication of the high quality of Metsä Fibre’s research and development activities and the new concepts."

"It also indicates their relevance in respect to finding solutions that help mitigating some of the greatest challenges facing society, such as population growth and resource scarcity,” says Niklas von Weymarn, Vice President, Research at Metsä Fibre.

More information can be found here.

4 October 2017

The ick factor: Dutch project making bike lanes and bottles from used loo roll

A pilot scheme in the Netherlands is sifting sewage for cellulose, which it says can be recycled into valuable products

When you flush the toilet, you’re probably not thinking about bike lanes or home insulation. But that’s where your used loo roll could one day end up if a Dutch project to extract cellulose from sewage rolls out. At the Geestmerambacht wastewater treatment plant near Alkmaar in the Netherlands, a two-year pilot project is using an industrial sieve to sift 400kg of cellulose, the natural fibres found in loo roll, from toilet sludge each day.

The cellulose, which would otherwise be incinerated at the end of the sewage treatment process, is cleaned and sterilised with very high temperatures and turned into a fluffy material or pellets. These are sold on as a raw material for products like asphalt and building materials.

A portion is also exported to the UK, where Brunel University is working on technology to transform it into an energy source, bioplastic bottles and other products.

More information can be found here.